Published Work

[Updated: 10 November 2018] 
It has finally occurred to me to post links to my work published elsewhere on the Web. I hope to keep this as a live blog post, updating it as and when the time arrives. Hopefully, there will be more. 🙃

Absence (Poem)

A poem about missing someone when they’re right there with you.

Memorized (Short Story)

(Coldnoon)
A short story told using the fragments of a woman’s life, about her relationships, the loves and not-loves of her life, and why she is scared of dogs.

Long Division (Short Story)

The Bangalore Review
A short story about two unlikely people, their relationship with their cities, each other, and how they are caught off guard by the unlikeliest thing.

Book Review: We That Are Young

(Helter Skelter)
A review of the painful debut novel by Preti Taneja and a reminder that some books come out of the publishing houses unedited and full of grammar mistakes.

I Wish They Had Taught Us About Hair Rather Than Dickens in School

(The Ladies Finger)
An essay in which I talk about why I haven’t read much Dickens, the one that got away, Bollywood influences, and yes, my hair.

Elif Shafak’s new book gives Muslim women the novel they deserve (but it needs a second draft)

(Scroll.in)
A book review of ‘Three Daughters of Eve’ in which I discuss how it is common for Muslim girls to have supportive fathers and why these characters should be written more, how this novel bears a glorious weight, and why Elif Shafak almost did it.

Why Women Must Gift Men Handkerchiefs, Dictionaries, and Glue

(HuffPost India)
An essay in light of the “mass molestation” incident in Bengaluru on 2017 New Year’s Eve trying to understand why men must molest women and why they behave in ways that depart from public decorum.

Perhaps no book comes as close to wrapping grief in words as this one

(Scroll.in)
A reflection on Max Porter’s book ‘Grief is a Thing with Feathers’ and why it is a special book for those dealing with loss and longing, discussing various motifs used and the quotable quotes.

‘Harraga’: An Algerian Story of Path Burning, Islamic Fundamentalism, and Ghosts

(HuffPost India)
A book review of Boualem Sansal’s novel ‘Harraga’ in which a Muslim woman heals the sick, takes danger in, talks to ghosts and goes above and beyond.

 

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